Called GoFlex the containers have a concertina shape that can be flexed to expand or contract to a flat form for space saving in storage and transport.

In a radical departure in form from ordinary plastic tub style containers, the range is aimed at convenience and versatility.

Tupperware’s vice-president of engineering and product development, David Kusuma, said GoFlex could be carried in a flat state and then expanded any time for use.

“The GoFlex product originated out of Tupperware’s desire to develop truly convenient and space saving storage. Our objective was space saving in transport, in storage and even in washing. The containers can be stacked like plates in the dishwasher and washed flat.”

“Technology requirements turned out to be the main driver for the final design. We had to take into account the way the product needed to function and the manufacturing processes selected to produce the product strongly influenced the final shape and form.”

According to Kusuma, the GoFlex brief involved a range of features including the need for it be highly adaptable – to be used for both basic food storage and also for food ‘on the go’. It needed to expand easily when in use and ‘magically disappear’ when not in use.

Like other Tupperware products, the range is completely water-tight when the container is engaged but is unique in the way it can expand or close for dishwashing requirements.

“While many design directions were originally evaluated, the success of the final solution was based on a combination of hard and soft materials,” Kusuma explained.

“A network of living hinges was developed in parallel with the materials to meet the performance expectations of this unique application.”

GoFlex has won a number of design awards including the Red Dot Award – Design Zentrum Nordrhein Westfalen and was listed as one of the twenty-five best products of the year by Fortune Magazine.

Kusuma says the development was a highly interactive and iterative process. “Because the product functionality was highly dependent on the geometry and end materials, prototype moulds needed to be built for each concept stage to prove out the functionality.

"We employed a long and detailed process to ensure that the product combined the highest functional value, was user friendly and met all of Tupperware’s long-term quality standards”.  

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