issue five

five

From the publisher

These professionals are now working closely with product development teams developing products in many sectors – biomedical, industrial, telecommunications, and sportswear. One of the most progressive areas is in nanotechnology where researchers are looking under the microscope to reveal a whole new world of materials, creating new from old at an atomic level for the way we live today, manipulating matter to create clever materials which will change the way products are designed and manufactured.

Composites – combining materials for greater performance – are now well entrenched and pave the way for the future. They include plastics that morph into ceramics to reduce the impact of fire, wood that is microwaved and filled with resin helping us to sustain our forests and to reduce timber wastage and new resins and fabrics that create lightweight sandwich structures for the transport industry.

This issue has an extensive eco design section and tackles it on two fronts from recycling materials to create new materials for reuse, to the creation of materials from organic substances that biodegrade efficiently reducing our plastic waste stockpiles.


Inside this issue

Clean detail, less fuss are winners

Clean detail, less fuss are winners

International designers are moving toward the pragmatic, aiming to solve everyday life solutions, judging by the entries in the 2003 Industrial Design Excellence Awards (IDEAs) in the US.

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Breaking new ground

Planes, trains and automobiles will soon be able to shed weight thanks to a light metal alloy developed by Australian researchers.

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Is the brand bubble about to burst?

In the past ten years many design industries have been caught in the spiral of marketing bravado presented in the guise of branding while the craft of creation has become secondary.

Work
Imaging looks below the surface

Imaging looks below the surface

It’s easy to see why nanotechnology has become a buzz word for contemporary design, but once you remove all the hype, the opportunities for future developments in materials become infinite.

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Golden Oldie turns fifty

Golden Oldie turns fifty

The famous FJ Holden, born in 1953 and long ago elevated to cult status, celebrated its golden anniversary this year.

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Flying high with new technology

Flying high with new technology

For more than ten years one of Australia’s leading Cooperative Research Centres has claimed a spot among the top five international research organisations exploring the development of alternative ‘liquid moulding’ processes for the production of advanced composite aerospace components.

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Making eye contact

Making eye contact

The contact lens industry has endeavoured for the last thirty years to find the ‘Holy Grail’ – a soft lens material that would enable the contact lens to be worn for long periods.

You

Research work needs more funding

Australia has the expertise and technical know-how to become a world leader in niche areas of materials engineering, according to Maruta Rodan, Chief Executive Officer of the Institute of Materials Engineering Association or IMEA.

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Microwave timber – a new look

Microwave timber – a new look

By adding value to Australia’s wood products, timber industries across the country are working to reduce the high level of imports and expand export opportunities.

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Materials matter

Since the dawn of his design career George M. Beylerian had one great passion: innovative materials. He loved the excitement of the discovery, the sensorial pleasure of the manipulation, the rational benefits of the classification. And he loved sharing his findings with his fellow designers.

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Plastic that won’t cost the earth

Plastic that won’t cost the earth

Australian company Plantic Technologies has unveiled a new biodegradable plastic made from plants. Called PlanticTM, it is expected to be one of the most significant advancements in packaging technology in the last decade and was featured in the launch issue of Curve.

You
No waste, low cost banana paper

No waste, low cost banana paper

Papyrus Australia – a research company established to investigate the potential for banana trees to produce high quality, low cost paper products – plans to build the first commercial scale banana ply paper manufacturing facility.

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The greening of materials

The greening of materials

The global debate on ecologically sustainable development is moving beyond forums and conferences, and gradually trickling down to a very practical level occupied by industry and hands-on innovators.

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Partners produce export earnings

Partners produce export earnings

A project involving teams of research scientists at the Cooperative Research Centre – Polymers (CRC-P) in Melbourne, and a team of engineers from Olex Australia has led to the launch of a special polymer compound that turns from plastic to ceramic when exposed to fire.

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