Typical drysuits can restrict the freedom of movement that kitesurfers need to perform difficult aerial tricks.

Taking inspiration from both urban streetwear and snowboard gear, the design team at Pryde Group in Hong Kong created a drysuit for kitesurfers known as the Lucifer. While it looks like a two-piece outfit, it is really a one-piece.
“Most of our riders spend their time in the water but occasionally they also snowkite or snowboard,” says Terence Wang, NPX product manager. “We realised that it would be ideal to have great looking gear, like you would in the snowboard industry, for the water. A drysuit would be the only option that allows the variety of colours, graphics and loose fit for waterwear.”
Curve Issue thirty-three, 2010
‘Adrenaline-fuelled design’ by Juliet Holdsworth

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