“I am very curious and consume information like crazy. I daydream a lot and I refuse to separate design from real life. In business, I follow Marc Aurel’s advice to leaders: ‘Be royal in what you do, but don’t expect to be popular’.

This isn’t as easy as it sounds. I am driven by my mission to give culture and creativity a more prominent place in business and in our society. This means that we creative people have to be more competent when it comes to business, money and management. And we need to be less egotistical – design is about elitist collaboration.”

Curve Issue twenty-three, 2008
 ‘Advocating holistic design’ by Belinda Stening

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