There are core discussions currently within the design community about design thinking. Over the last few years, design thinking was going to be the holy grail – it was going to change the world of business and designers were going to be the saviours of business; we often aimed to try to do everything ourselves and build multifaceted, multi-skilled design teams who could run projects from soup to nuts, beginning to end.

“The danger that I see in this direction is that you can breed a team of generalists, and quickly lose sight of the real core skills that made us valuable in the first instance. We need to find the right balance between system thinking, identifying patterns, looking for synergies, while still respecting the simple act of designing.
“Essentially, business needs more creative people, regardless of which department they sit in. But, equally, business also needs those individuals who can create beautiful, desirable products where the emotive qualities of a brand can really be brought to life through the product experience. Design thinking all too often neglected to recognise the need for those who can give form to the intangible attributes of a brand.”
Curve Issue forty, 2012
‘Sean Carney’ by Belinda Stening

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