This was the paradigm that Nicholas Negroponte, the One Laptop per Child program team at MIT and the designers at fuseproject, wanted to change, and they did. They created XO laptop, which sold for around US$170.


The XO, specifically designed for children in developing countries, is the size of a textbook and lighter than a lunchbox. It has helped to bridge the digital divide that developing countries are experiencing by not only educating children in these countries but by giving their parents and siblings the same opportunity as well. The laptop has changed many aspects of learning, as well as teaching.
Curve Issue twenty-two, 2008
‘The democratic design of Yves Béhar’ by Belinda Stening

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