This was the paradigm that Nicholas Negroponte, the One Laptop per Child program team at MIT and the designers at fuseproject, wanted to change, and they did. They created XO laptop, which sold for around US$170.


The XO, specifically designed for children in developing countries, is the size of a textbook and lighter than a lunchbox. It has helped to bridge the digital divide that developing countries are experiencing by not only educating children in these countries but by giving their parents and siblings the same opportunity as well. The laptop has changed many aspects of learning, as well as teaching.
Curve Issue twenty-two, 2008
‘The democratic design of Yves Béhar’ by Belinda Stening

read the original article

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Shaping a taste for Scandinavian design

Shaping a taste for Scandinavian design

The current vogue for Scandinavian design recalls a time when an alternative first emerged to challenge the British and American hegemony of local design. Dr Simon Jackson looks back at the early influence.

Share
No place to hide

No place to hide

Almost two years ago, Designforum Svensk Form (Stockholm) launched its Project Room, a venue that gives a young designer free reign for a week.

Rest, You
Taking colour and trim for a spin

Taking colour and trim for a spin

Curve editor Belinda Stening spoke to Alexandra Korndörfer, BMW’s International head of colour and trim design for the M and Individual vehicles, when she was in Melbourne recently.

Play, Share, You