But what if travel was more relaxing and not so stressful? What if we took days to reach our destination and we arrived feeling refreshed and calm?

This is exactly what Seymourpowell, a London-based design and innovation company, proposed in its visionary transportation concept called Aircruise.
The Aircruise is a 265-metre-tall luxurious airship concept powered by natural energy in the form of hydrogen and solar, and instead of taking a few hours to reach your destination, it may take a few days of drifting leisurely alongside the clouds.
“This Aircruise concept questions whether the future of luxury travel should be based around space-
constrained, resource-hungry and all-too-often stressful airline travel,” says Nick Talbot, Design Director at Seymourpowell. “A more serene transport experience will appeal to people looking for a more reflective journey, where the experience of travel itself is more important than getting from A to B quickly.”
With this self-generated project, Talbot and his team wanted to challenge our preconceptions about the way we travel in the future.
Curve Issue thirty-two, 2010
‘Time out in the clouds’ by Tanya Weaver

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