Yet we’re all too familiar with the inevitable detritus of plastic cups, plates and packaging that need to be discarded afterwards, jamming rubbish bins – not to mention landfills.

Boldº_a design company, a Brazilian firm, operating out of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, has come up with a sustainable solution to the often eco-unfriendly business of picnicking. Aspiring to do away with wasteful plastic plates and wrappings that – due to the inconvenience of carrying heavy ceramics and glass on outings – often punctuate outdoor eating, they have come up with a light, portable and ecologically aware picnic set, called Combine.

Described as picnic eco-chic by the company, the unit comprises a number of reusable plates and containers that fit together and stack compactly in a nest. The modules can be purchased in individual pieces or as a complete set that provides everything a party of up to six requires for setting up an outdoor feast.


The full kit is made up of two large bowls, a dividing bowl, a pot for sauces, plates, cups and coasters. From salads and puddings to chips and dips, every receptacle has been considered.

The wares are made from an eco-friendly bamboo multilaminate called Bambootube and a moldable composite of bamboo fibres and rice hulls. With a bamboo exterior, not only do they look enticingly environmental, but with a selection of 11 different shades of trimming, each unit has its own aesthetic appeal and individuality.

Combine also includes a sousplat – a thin heat-molded silicone net that can be used as a table mat and also doubles as a convenient carrying bag for the unit. Minimally designed, the set stacks together vertically in one unit to make it compact and easy to transport.

Unfortunately Combine has not yet been released for sale, but once it is, this easy-to-carry, eco-friendly solution to picnicking is sure to be seen everywhere, dotting our beaches and parks.

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