The set is comprised of five simple bowls, each different but clearly belonging to the same family. When apart, each bowl has its own shape, size and material – suggesting its use. When put together, they form a unified set.

The largest of the set is a fruit bowl made of polished stainless steel. The next largest, made of dark brown melamine, can be used for preparing food or salads and the middle bowl of glazed stoneware is for foods au gratin.

Made of turned solid wood, the small bowl is for snacks, while the very smallest in the set is made of green glass and can be used as a container for fine, powdery cooking ingredients.

The profound appeal of the nesting bowls concept was considered through the development of the project, Claesson Koivisto Rune noting that variations on the theme were represented in all cultures throughout history.

“[This] seems to suggest that we are looking at a fundamental human love affair with an artefact that goes deeper than culture, deeper than history, deeper than geography.”

The Stockholm-based design office summed up the ethos behind the design.
“The bowl must be functional. A beautiful bowl that doesn’t work is not really beautiful.”

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