As with many of its design projects, the designers drew inspiration from nature, specifically the ginkgo tree.

“In Japan, the ginkgo tree is venerated. Several ginkgo trees survived the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945 and continue to live today. For this reason, the trees are considered a ‘bearer of hope’ and a symbol of resilience and peace on the island nation,” explains Raquel Molina, interior designer at Stone.

The designers started to sketch their ideas for the wall panels based on this distinctive fan-shaped ginkgo leaf. Their thought was that the panel could be mounted and then repeated in a wealth of combinations.

“Gingko is not just an isolating element, it is a piece with which many different interior landscapes can be created. It is an inspiring piece to recall wonderful places,” says Molina.

To help reduce ambient noise and echoes in the room, the material chosen was hot-pressed polyester form felt. “We chose felt because it absorbs the sound better and it is a material that can be used in many different ways. It is also a material that can be more easily thermoformed,” says Molina.

Colour was also important as different shades would help to accentuate the landscape effect they were after. Standard colours include shades of grey, red, blue and green. However, users can choose to have the panels laminated in a colour of their choice.

“We also designed a simple system to hang them so changing the pattern is really easy,” adds Molina. This means that the user could regularly change the pattern to suite their interior or taste. So, for instance, in winter Gingko could be a cloudy sky and in autumn a forest ablaze in orange and red. 

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