Cape Town was designated World Design Capital (WDC) 2014 at the International Design Alliance (IDA) Congress in October 2011.

It’s an honour bestowed biennially by the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (ICSID) to a city that recognises the value of design thinking and is dedicated to using design as a tool for social, cultural and economic development. Previous winners have included Helsinki, Seoul and Turin.

The WDC 2014 program, which launched on 31 December 2013 with the biggest New Year’s Eve party Cape Town has ever hosted, features over 450 projects that are true to the overall theme of ‘Live Design. Transform Life’.

“The projects in the program capture the indomitable South African spirit that sees something made from nothing, covering initiatives that are concepts and ideas to newly hatched projects to mature businesses,” says Alayne Reesberg, CEO of Cape Town Design NPC, the implementation company of WDC 2014. “All of which address a particular issue or need and seek to find solutions through design, driving collaborations across disciplines, while improving lives socially and economically.”

www.wdccapetown2014.com

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