For this reason, the presentation at the last edition of Eurocucina in Milan of the Whirlpool GreenKitchen™ as an actual, feasible kitchen – the Ecocompatta, a beautiful compact, all wood and glass design by Paolo Rizzatto for Veneta Cucine – was really good news.

The concept of a green kitchen was designed and developed by Whirlpool Europe and first launched in 2008 as a synergetic combination of single appliances that save water, heat and electricity. Inspired by nature, the GreenKitchen seeks out ways to adapt, reduce and recycle, using only what is needed for each task. It reduces waste that negatively impacts the environment, while optimising resources and imitating cycles found in nature.

Leveraging on this first idea, Whirlpool presented an updated version in 2010: a kitchen system with interconnected appliances that work together as part of a kitchen ecosystem to be integrated into the upcoming smart grid system.
Two years later (April of this year), Whirlpool was able to finally show the first real application – in tandem with Veneta Cucine, who appointed designer Paolo Rizzatto to define a functional, warm and welcoming kitchen to host the appliances – actualising products connected to each other.

In this eco kitchen, the 6th Sense PowerClean Dishwasher and the 6th Sense Fresh Control Combi refrigerator are connected with each other. This means that the wasted heat generated by the refrigerator is used to provide the dishwasher with an A+++ performance.

The heat generated by the refrigerator compressor is used to warm up water stored in a tank within the compressor area. This pre-heated water is sent to the dishwasher through a pipe and used during the washing cycle to bring consumer savings in the range of one energy class.

The kitchen also includes the 6th Sense Chronos Oven with induction technology and the 6th Sense Induction Hob.

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