They were selected from more than three thousand submissions representing eighty-eight countries with ideas for future home appliances.

While the students from Australian universities did not take out first prize they have enjoyed a range of workshops and activities as part of a six-day Electrolux design festival called Future Design Days, in Stockholm.

The winner, Airwash, is a waterless washing unit that utilises negative ions, compressed air and deodorants to clean clothes.

Airwash, developed by Wendy Chua and Gabriel Tan, students from Wendy Chua and Gabriel Tan, eliminates the need for detergent and water. By using atmospheric air and negative ions.

According to the judges, Airwash was selected as the winner because of its intuitive, ecological and beautiful design. Airwash also does away with the expensive, time consuming task of going to the dry cleaner.

Both of the Australian university finalists are internationals – Swede Erik Andershed is currently enrolled in the University of Swinburne, in Melbourne, studying Honours in Industrial Design; and Singaporean Wang Sin Ee was the recipient of the University of New South Wales’ (UNSW) Jubilee Scholarship for full tuition and is studying Industrial Design at the UNSW in Sydney.

This is the second year that UNSW has been represented in the final judging. Last year’s competition was won by three UNSW industrial design students with their concept of the Rockpool waterless dishwasher.

Rockpool has, with the other concept products that made last year’s finals, toured the world as part of the Electrolux Global Design Laboratory Exhibition.  

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