Working with model makers, engineers and other designers, Pedone acknowledges the marriage between Japanese know-how and traditional Italian styling has been a winning combination.

“The Tamago project started in March 2001,” he explains. “At that time, Honda had a strong presence in the 125/150cc scooter market with two models. They were ‘@ and SH’, both popular and both designed and realised in Italy. 

“With the Tamago, the idea was to create an alternative commuter to usual scooters, a product able to attract attention in the crowded future town for its aesthetic and new functions.”

Pedone says the designers of Honda Research and Development in Rome developed the idea of a soft and friendly object, with a strong personality that was easy to personalise in colours and aesthetic.

“The sketch selected to consolidate this vision was that of a bulky vehicle with a fake tank that could store many pieces of luggage,” he said. 

In June 2001, the first mock up model was realised in polyurethane. “In order not to influence traditional stylistic canons of Italian tradition, Japanese management delegated the project entirely to Italian designers. 

“The first prototype colour was a pearled lemon yellow, chosen to highlight the futuristic line and soft volumes. The model was received favourably also in Japan during internal presentations and Honda’s senior management suggested a further and much more realistic development. 

“Afterwards, a prototype no longer static but running was refined in all details and realised with the cooperation of Italian and Japanese engineers of Honda R&D in Rome.

“After almost two years of research, the result was an original vehicle that shows a high level of engineering excellence.”  

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