The project was a collaborative one by a team of students and staff at Monash University’s Faculty of Art and Design in Melbourne. The team worked in collaboration with manufacturers Inflatable Image Technologies and Sakimoto Pty Ltd and was sponsored by BG Architecture.

The design co-ordinator Darragh O’Brien, a lecturer in Interior Architecture, explains the concept:

“Athough in life we rarely experience a suppression of signals from the surrounding environment, when this phenomenon actually occurs, the experience can lead to a sensation of being away.

“The concept of the daydream underpinned the Solivoid project.

“Electronic media has the potential to transform our experiential environment and therefore to modulate architectural space.

"When surface appropriates the mutable attributes of digital systems, matter and information become interchangeable, allowing occupants of the Solivoid space to be suspended between inside and outside; between here and there.

“Unfolding digital events continuously skim the surfaces of inflatable ‘stem cell’ structures, affecting our perception and therefore our experience of the space.

“These space-defining elements have no recognisable form, but they are not formless, rather they are in the process of becoming complete. The term stem-cell is used because of its conceptual potential for specificity. In this case, forms become specific, gaining in purpose, through human occupation and interaction.

“As multimedia team co-ordinator Troy Innocent suggests, the work draws from the metaphor of a ‘media-organism’, where a generative system is used to combine and manipulate the moving image.

“This system plays with signal and surface, light and shadow, flux and intensity; reflecting the infinite variability of natural light patterns but located within an artificial environment.

“Visitor response causes shifts in the behaviour of the media-organism and therefore feeds back into the generative system, causing it to create novel experiences.

“Electronic media moderates between surface and space. Changing digital imagery on the inflated surfaces effects perception and experience and animates the Solivoid form.”   

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