The team describe themselves as producers of new ideas in product and environmental design. “Our objective is to rethink our living environment and to create unexpected features in familiar things that are not always detected at first glance,” says Poncelet.

Their projects are handled from concept to completion and every detail is carefully worked through.

“We have two ways of working. Sometimes we work on personal projects – furniture, wallpaper and lighting. We develop new objects from concept to prototype.

"Then we find producers to help us develop these objects and bring them to market. We manage the brand, packaging and marketing, as well. But we don’t produce or sell the products ourselves – we prefer to work with professionals.

“We also work for clients as environmental designers. We create booths, shop interiors, exhibitions and installations for special events. Right now, for example, we are developing a lounge area in the city for the Nuit Blanche 07 in Brussels, a yearly event that lasts one night in each big European city.”

Poncelet and Lecouturier met in the industrial design department at La Cambre, Brussels’ renowned visual arts and architecture school. After two years, Lecouturier moved to the sculpture department. Poncelet finished her five-year degree in design with a four-month exchange in London.

“Then, apart from some collaborations, we both went our own way,” says Poncelet. “Emilie worked in an art and exhibition organisation and in fashion environments. I worked in various design and environmental-design offices, in Belgium and worldwide. We then decided to join forces and to create Atelier Blink.”

“Interaction with consumers is of special interest to us. An object has to work and be comfortable, beautiful and so on. But it also has to bring a new vision.”

The Octopus beanbag is a good example of their fresh thinking, of the way they give objects an unexpected twist. It’s a chair that can be reconfigured to suit different moods and spaces.

“It was first created for a charity auction sale. Designers, artists and fashion designers were asked to create something new with a pair of jeans. We added a couple more pairs and some buttons, and created the Octopus.

“We are now trying to get jeans companies interested in the product. We think it could help them to position themselves as environmentally friendly, as they’d be using recycled or unused pieces.”

The Psst-it Table, a wooden table covered with a stack of giant memo-stick sheets, is at the prototype phase. It will be presented in various exhibits within the next few months.

“Refills of different colours are available. Each table is 70 x 70 cm. We first thought the table would be used for meetings and offices. But it could also be used for cafes and restaurants.”

“We don’t like to specialise in one design technique or one type of product but to immerse ourselves into new areas all the time. We try to see things with a fresh eye.”  

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