Seeds and soil are packed in an aseptic and airtight tetra-pak, with a scored tear line for easy opening. Die-cut holes are pierced for drainage.

All that is then needed is sunlight and water.

Four medicinal herbs have been selected for their ability to be easily cultivated indoors: basil, chamomile, mint and thyme.

The herbs are used in teas, cooking or salves. Symbols on the pack indicate ailments, remedies, ingestion techniques and nutritive requirements.

“Advances in modern medicine have created artificial methods of curing everyday ailments; consequently, traditional techniques have become obsolete and severed from our modern culture,” Lee says.

“My yearnings for a healthier lifestyle and attitude played an important part when I was deciding what to do for this project. As a designer, whose role in a manufactured society is to create artificial products, I thought it most appropriate to design with nature.”   

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