His rotationally moulded ‘original stools’ – shaped by journeys amongst rivers, hills and woodlands – are testament to this process. “My ‘original stools’ are the children of a carefully conceived, free-range kinetic process that captures specific time and place by permitting topography and meteorology to provide the distinguishing individual characteristics of each piece,” says Mikel.

A tough, all-terrain orb houses a fixed silicon mould of the stool. The mould is filled with resin, the orb is shut tight and is then released into an environment where it may be tossed around in white water in a river, or rolled down a winding forest path.

The movement of the orb on each individual journey creates an original resin stool, unique in form and colour. Mikel, who recently completed a master’s degree in product and spatial design at Kingston University in London, calls it “a manifestation of time and place”.

“The process is paramount – embracing serendipity and chance and negating controlled intervention,” he adds. “It celebrates the importance of coincidence. The journey of the orb forms a strong character, so an essential shift from object to experience takes place.”

“Seeing the orb rolling down a hill, knowing that inside something is evolving, is captivating. The fact that you can’t see anything from the outside makes it mysterious. The pattern, the form, the character – all materialises without any intervention. I am merely a spectator.

“The moment of demoulding is almost like a birth, as you don’t know what to expect except something unique. You can’t treat it as a normal piece of furniture. It is a character, an individual. It is neither ugly nor beautiful – it’s a personality. Nobody is perfect. Perfect is not a character attribute.”  

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