issue two

two

From the publisher

This issue is fresh and vital, comprehensive and focused. It reflects the hard working and clever people it features – from designers on the shores of Torquay to rotational moulders implementing new technology across the country.

Denis Smitka, our profile personality, takes you behind the scenes for a close look at his work ethic, while our first hand reports on Bruce Mau’s studio style and Richard Seymour’s emotional ergonomics capture the essence of two unique approaches to creative endeavour.

We are proud to inform our readers of Curve’s success at the recent Australian Business and Specialists Publishers Association Awards where our launch issue received a highly commended. It is certainly an honour to have our work recognised by our peers.

Many thanks to all of our regular and new subscribers; we can all look forward to a big year for Curve in 2003.


Inside this issue

Geometry – from sea to studio

Summer for Australians means long days on the beach supported by a paraphernalia of designed objects: Speedos, towels, wetsuits, surfboards, rubber thongs, buckets and spades. But when we leave the beach relaxed at the end of the day, we carry new treasures.

Share
Emotional ergonomics

Emotional ergonomics

Richard Seymour is one of Europe’s leading product designers. Since forming Seymour Powell, with his partner Dick Powell, in 1984 the UK based consultancy has risen to a commanding position on the international stage, with clients as diverse as Ford, Nokia and BMW.

Share
Designing ‘peoplescapes’

Designing ‘peoplescapes’

Information on social and cultural change is a bit like software, mysterious in the way it works and in what it deals with, yet everyone thinks they know all about it. It's indispensable, yet soon out of date - and useful, as long as you understand how to use it properly.

Share
‘The Wonderboard of 1000 Uses’

‘The Wonderboard of 1000 Uses’

'The Wonderboard of 1000 Uses’ – thus was Masonite described in its advertisements in magazines read by thousands of Australians around the time of World War II.

Share

Why time is not a level playing field

Time. Put your pens down. Make sure you’ve written your name on the cover sheet. Hand your work to the front. If you hate time pressures then design is certainly the wrong field to be in.

Share
No spills, no frills winepack

No spills, no frills winepack

Many design and engineering graduates may remember that popular problem solving exercise of how to package an egg so that when dropped from a top floor studio window the egg lands safely and undamaged in the forecourt below.

Work

Mau – focus on teamwork

Since its inception in Toronto in 1985, Bruce Mau Design has gained international recognition for cross-disciplinary work.

Work
Round ‘em up Rawhide

Round ‘em up Rawhide

Paul Weaver of Design College, Queensland saw a need to lift the profile of a mundane but highly sought after canine snack ... an animal hide edible teething disc sold loose in pet shops.

Play
LincLab

LincLab

New technologies designed to further enhance the ‘intelligence’ of textiles are now being developed in fields as diverse as medicine, computers and music.

Work
Rotational moulding

Rotational moulding

Despite reluctance from some sections of the design community to embrace rotational moulding as a preferred option for prototyping or product development, technological advances in recent years have made it difficult to ignore.

Work